Young Pope Takes Cold Shower

Young Pope Cold Shower

Brides of Christ, Giulia Salemi And Dayane Mello, wore x rated bridal gowns to my premiere. Don’t masturbate to the Young Pope’s face Dayane. I know the devil is inside you by the snake necklace you wear. The Young Pope wants U2 find love before you give away all your goods. You can’t tempt me to touch my own naughty bits young brides of Christ. I’ll just take this cold shower.

Mother Mary, I quit doing coke but I need a smoke and my cherry coke. Smoking reduces the sex drive. That’s Pope Pius XIII’s secret.

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Rachel Weisz: Jews Run Hollywood

Rachel Weisz: Enemy at the Gates

In an interview Weisz gave back in 2001, she tells us Jews do indeed run Hollywood and Jewish women were not allowed to be actresses because Jewish men thought it was a form of prostitution.

EMMA: When we were at the drugstore you innocently opened up Talk Magazine and I heard a shriek of dismay.
RACHEL: Yeah, I literally saw not only the most disgusting, but the most ridiculous photograph I’ve ever seen of any woman.
EMMA: And who was it of?
RACHEL: It was me. [laughs] It was me photographed by David Bailey, who had some kind of concept that because it was for a Russian film, I would be wearing a Russian hat. But you can’t really see the hat, just fur everywhere. And my nose looks like it’s … just a really outsized nose, you know.
EMMA: But, you see, you’re holding back from saying what you said at the store, which was that you thought you looked too Jewish. Is it limiting as an actress to be perceived as being too ethnic in any way?
RACHEL: Well, I think you and I have always felt the same way — that we’re Jewish but we can get away with just being exotic. We’re kind of Jews in disguise. Those cultural stereotypes about the Jew with the big hooky nose and the fleshy face rub off on you. That’s terrible to admit, isn’t it.
EMMA: Well, it’s that Jackie Mason joke about how no Jewish woman wants to look Jewish: “‘You think I look maybe a little Italian, I look a little Russian, perhaps I can be Spanish?’ … ‘You look Jewish!'”
RACHEL: Hollywood’s run by Jews. I was advised by an American agent when I was about 19 to change my surname. And I said “Why? Jews run Hollywood.” He said “Exactly.” He had a theory that all the executives think acting’s a job for shiksas.
EMMA: Of all the self-loathing Jews in the world, the most self-loathing are the Hollywood Jews. They don’t want to see images of themselves on screen. That’s why Lauren Bacall had to hide her identity, and Winona Ryder changed her name from Horowitz.
RACHEL: In some way acting is prostitution, and Hollywood Jews don’t want their own women to participate. Also, there’s an element of Portnoy’s Complaint — they all fancy Aryan blondes.
EMMA: For Beautiful Creatures, in which you play a battered woman and trophy girlfriend, you had to go blonde. You’re such an über-brunette; did you find you lost your sense of self?
RACHEL: Completely. The last day of shooting, I went home to see my father and stepmother. She rang me the next day and said, “I never want to see that girl ever again. The girl who came to our house was like a horrendous, vulgar Spice Girl.”
EMMA: Who are you a big fan of?
RACHEL: Denis Leary.
EMMA: Why are comedians so sexy?
RACHEL: They just are.
EMMA: I think it’s because laughing is an allegory for orgasms. It’s something you can’t help doing.
RACHEL: You can’t stop yourself coming. Not once you start. It’s also that comedians don’t have the kind of narcissism that actors have. They’re writers who perform their own material. It’s more interesting. And they’re sexy because they risk more. Stand-up comedians risk more than anyone.
EMMA: When you were at Cambridge, you started your own theater company. How was that?
RACHEL: Amazing. We went to the Edinburgh Festival three times. Just me and another girl, Sasha Hales were the performers. We wrote about eight plays together, we went through the whole gamut of what two people can do onstage with each other. That was the happiest time of my life creatively. The best one we did was called Slight Possession.
EMMA: I remember it. I remember being … I have to say, very intimidated by how you look. Are you aware that you intimidate women sometimes?
RACHEL: If I’m just in dungarees, I don’t think I would intimidate anyone. If I went out in killer heels and full makeup, blow dry, the whole thing — anyone dressed up like that could be intimidating to men and women, really. It’s so, look at me. Do you know what I mean? But I love women.
EMMA: What is it? The sound of their voice, how they look?
RACHEL: I like their heads, I like the way they think.
EMMA: Women think like jazz.
RACHEL: They’re stream-of-consciousness. They’ll improvise, and they’re happy if someone brings in a new beat. Whereas men are very point-A-to-point-B. They just want to get there.
EMMA: I think that’s the reason you never survived in Los Angeles, why you had to go home. The driving thing. You’d never have an adventure along the way. If you were going to point B …
RACHEL: Yeah.
EMMA: You had to leave from point A, and nothing could happen in between. Whereas in New York or in London, you’re walking somewhere and crazy poop happens on the way. Tell me about those months in L.A.
RACHEL: I went into quite a major depression. I was watching so many daytime TV shows. And then I would get in my car and drive to these auditions listening to the radio. I feel sick now when I listen to the radio, all these commercials for different car dealers. I just felt like the world was so desperate and lonely and sad and people were trying to sell cars and no one wanted to buy them.
EMMA:
RACHEL: My friend was saying that no one flirts there. Like at the traffic light when you’re stopped. People are very focused on their own thing. I don’t mean just sexual flirting, but verbal flirting. In L.A., unless you’ve just won an Oscar or you’re Mr. Studio Head, no one talks to you. Even at parties. I was at this big Hollywood party; no one looked. Everyone is blinkered and they just kind of scan the room for anyone important. L.A. makes you feel ugly.
EMMA: Really?
RACHEL: Because if you’re an actress, no one pays you any attention. And you immediately start thinking, God, I must have a nose job. [laughs] Or, I must get that boob job, or I must get that lipo … whatever it is.
EMMA: You have these two parallel careers going on where you do these strange, wonderful, bizarre art films and then you have this big breakout with The Mummy.
RACHEL: Breakout sounds like coming out with acne. [laughs]
EMMA: When I was in London, I went to visit you on the set of The Mummy II.
RACHEL: In my Fleetwood Mac outfit.
EMMA: You looked like Stevie Nicks. And I remember you were having a hard time caring about the person who played your character’s child.
RACHEL: Yeah, I didn’t feel emotionally connected to him.
EMMA: You were trying to method-act your way into giving a damn whether he lived or died. [laughs]
RACHEL: It was very hard because we were up against that blue screen.
EMMA: There’s a lot of jiggery-pokery and special effects. Is working with all those effects a little de-humanizing?
RACHEL: It can certainly feel quite mechanical. You have to talk into thin air and imagine that there are 10,000 Pygmies running at you. But you have to remember how you used your imagination as a child.
EMMA: You told me that you think the best you’ve ever been was when you did Suddenly, Last Summer on stage in London, which was last year?
RACHEL: Yeah. That’s the best acting I’ve ever done.
EMMA: Why?
RACHEL: Because I completely connected with the character. This is really terrible to say, because Catherine is a woman who’s a little bit unstable and hysterical. She’s been pimping for her cousin Sebastian, attracting boys on the beach in Tunisia.
EMMA: Tennessee Williams had to hide any hints whatsoever of homosexuality.
RACHEL: It’s not explicit because it was written in the ’30s. No one ever says he was homosexual. It’s completely obvious, but no one actually spells it out. She’s kind of in love with him actually. That’s the real tragedy of it. I’ve been in love with heterosexually challenged men.
EMMA: Is that because you get to be admired without having sex?
RACHEL: Definitely. You develop this incredible intimacy that isn’t going to lead to sex, but can be very sexual. That’s something I find liberating. Also, because heterosexually challenged men don’t fit into any received notions of family, they have to rethink everything. I find that they are often completely original.
EMMA: Isn’t it funny that the currency of Hollywood is sex, but the people there are mostly so unsexy?
RACHEL: Right. False tits, collagen lips, people dressing very sexually, but it’s a completely sanitized sexuality. It’s boring and unreal. There’s not much room for eccentricity in Hollywood, and eccentricity is what’s sexy in people. I think London’s sexy because it’s so full of eccentrics.
EMMA: Brendan Fraser, who stars with you in The Mummy, seemed very nice. And you said a really funny thing. You said, “He’s just like pornography.”
RACHEL: He’s got a pornographic body. He’s so massive — he doesn’t look that big on screen. I don’t mean fat, I mean muscular. He’s six-foot-three and his thighs …
EMMA: Tell me about Brendan Fraser’s thighs. [laughs]
RACHEL: They’re enormous. He wears tight, jodphur-y trousers with big boots and his costumes are all really sexy. And that big back rippling under the shirt.
EMMA: It was just before I saw you that you filmed Enemy at the Gates, the new Jean-Jacques Annaud movie. What’s it about?
RACHEL: The seizure of Stalingrad. The civilians and soldiers got together and defended the city against the Nazis, against all odds. Jude Law and Joe Fiennes play two Russians who both fall in love with me. I pick Jude, and we end up together.
EMMA: Good choice. Who did you click with the most on that film?
RACHEL: I really clicked as an actor with Jude. We both come from theater, and in theater you have to give as much as you take. Movie actors get used to close-ups and it all becomes monologue. But Jude is right there with you every second of the way.
EMMA: Can we say — just because it’s bizarre — where we’re doing this interview?
RACHEL: Yeah, I think we should.
EMMA: Okay. We’re in Los Angeles. Last time you were having such an awful time here. Now you’re with Sam. Is it weird? I mean, he is the fracking daddy at the moment. Do people get on bended knee at his feet?
RACHEL: Well, I don’t know, because he works all day. The other night we were at a bar and these people were turned around staring at him, whispering and pointing, really going overboard. Then as we were leaving, we looked back at the table behind us, and it was Michelle Pfeiffer and her husband David E. Kelley.
EMMA: (Question….)
RACHEL: Yeah, and we were like, “that’s L.A.” They weren’t looking at Sam at all, they were looking at Michelle Pfeiffer at the table behind us.
EMMA: (Question….)
RACHEL: The thing that happens is, if Sam pays, the waiters will see his name on the card and they’ll just say, “I loved that movie.” It’s quite earnest and nice. He doesn’t go in for that big Hollywood scene.
EMMA: So what kind of cowboy boots are you gonna buy on Monday?
RACHEL: I like the idea of the short ones because they’re so unusual, like ankle length. And either black with red tips or the camel color with brown tips.
EMMA: They’re very Angelina Jolie.
RACHEL:She’s gorgeous. They wanted me to go and meet her to play her sister.
EMMA: What does your family think of all this? Are they disappointed you haven’t had a more academic career?
RACHEL: No. Although my mother would have liked it if I was a doctor and a movie star at the same time because mum’s greedy. Dad always says that my personality has been irrevocably malformed by acting, so that I’m now unsuitable to anything else. He’s sort of joking and sort of not.
EMMA: Your dad’s an inventor?
RACHEL:Yeah.
EMMA: And your stepmum’s a psychiatrist?
RACHEL: And my mum’s a psychiatrist.
EMMA: Do you think you’re more or less well-adjusted for having grown up around all this psychoanalysis?
RACHEL: The thing is, I feel like I’m more well-adjusted, but I think that’s an illusion.

Joe’s note:

Only recently we’ve started to see Jewish women as sex symbols in Hymiewood and Jewish women starting to marry outside of the tribe. Usually a Jewish lady is forced to marry a Jewish man even though he has a dozen shiksas on the side. As every Jewish male prays every single morning: “Thank God I’m not a Goy, a slave or a woman!”

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Vigilant Citizen on Doctor Parnassus

By Vigilant | Category: Vigilant Reports

Heath Ledger’s last movie is a mind-boggling one. From its enigmatic storyline to the mysteries surrounding its production, “The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus” deserves to be duly explored. An interpretation of its rich symbolism reveals to the viewers timeless esoteric truths as well as coded references to today’s occult cryptocracy. This article looks at the mystical meaning of the “The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus” and the sacrificial nature of Heath Ledger’s death.


It seems the last movies of actors who die prematurely are often heavily symbolic. A single viewing of the trailer for The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus was sufficient to convince me of the movie’s deep esoteric undertones. Terry Gilliam’s productions have often dealt with occult themes, but this one seemed unusually flagrant. I was therefore looking forward to the movie’s reviews and the potential discussions it would engender. However, I found nothing but superficial blurbs and critiques talking about a “fantastic adventure” or something of the sort. So I watched the movie to see if I misjudged the trailer and, after the first minute and a half, all of my doubts evaporated. The movie begins with a man (Anton) dressed as Mercury (“Hermes” of the Greeks and “Thoth” of the Egyptians) announcing Dr. Parnassus, who is dressed as a monk, holding a lotus flower, a symbol of Eastern mysticism. Pretty esoteric. We’ll first look at the underlying meaning of the movie and follow with the strange symbols relating to Heath Ledger’s death.

The Esoteric Meaning of the Story

The premise of The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus conceals a meaning for those who, in the words of Anton playing Mercury, have “eyes to see and ears to hear”. Here’s a quick summary of the movie.

“The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus is a fantastical morality tale, set in the present day. It tells the story of Dr. Parnassus and his extraordinary ‘Imaginarium’, a traveling show where members of the audience get an irresistible opportunity to choose between light and joy or darkness and gloom. Blessed with the extraordinary gift of guiding the imaginations of others, Dr. Parnassus is cursed with a dark secret. Long ago he made a bet with the devil, Mr. Nick, in which he won immortality. Many centuries later, on meeting his one true love, D.r Parnassus made another deal with the devil, trading his immortality for youth, on condition that when his first-born reached its 16th birthday he or she would become the property of Mr. Nick.

Valentina is now rapidly approaching this ‘coming of age’ milestone and Dr. Parnassus is desperate to protect her from her impending fate. Mr. Nick arrives to collect but, always keen to make a bet, renegotiates the wager. Now the winner of Valentina will be determined by whoever seduces the first five souls. Enlisting a series of wild, comical and compelling characters in his journey, Dr. Parnassus promises his daughter’s hand in marriage to the man that helps him win. In this captivating, explosive and wonderfully imaginative race against time, Dr. Parnassus must fight to save his daughter in a never-ending landscape of surreal obstacles – and undo the mistakes of his past once and for all.”
-IMDB

The storyline revolves around a classic Faustian theme, in which Dr. Parnassus makes various bets with the Devil (played by Tom Waits) throughout his life. Looking deeper into the symbolism of the story, Dr. Parnassus and his traveling show are a metaphor for the esoteric teachings transmitted through the ages via Mystery schools. He is a human manifestation of the “path to enlightenment” of the Buddhists or the “inner-Christ” of the Gnostics. By inviting people into the magic mirror, he transports them onto the spiritual plane where they can choose between spiritual fulfillment and enlightenment (represented by a pyramid or a ladder, depending on the person) or ignorance and materialism (represented by a pub or a sleazy motel). Dr. Parnassus says “he transmits the story that sustains the universe,” which is a poetic way of saying that he is the vehicle for the secret teachings leading to illumination. He provides the path that allows the communion between humanity and divinity. The entire symbolism surrounding Paranassus’ theater is inspired by the esoteric teachings of the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, Buddhists and other esoteric schools. The stage contains many interesting occult symbols.

From Janus, the two-headed Greek god to the Masonic twin pillars and the All-Seeing Eye, Dr. Paranassus’ stage reveals the spiritual nature of the theater

Parnassus’ name is also a reference to occult initiation. His name is derived from Mount Parnassus, the sacred mountain of the Dionysus, the Greek god of mystery religious rites (also known as the roman Bacchus). Mount Parnassus also contained the famed oracle of Delphi, the mystical site where people could obtain spiritual revelations.

Dealing with the Devil


As stated above, the story of the immortal Dr. Parnassus is analogous with the evolution of the Mysteries throughout History. This story was not always perfect and numerous influences have altered its course. There is a constant exchange in the movie between Dr. Parnassus and the Devil and it ultimately becomes evident that they actually need each other in order to exist and to stay relevant. Through their back and forth, they reenact the ancient principle of duality, the constant struggle opposing good versus evil and light versus darkness. This concept is visually represented by the Masonic black and white checkerboard pattern. While explaining his dealings with the Devil to his daughter, Dr. Parnassus explains in coded terms the nature of his essence. It can be found within Buddhist monks, in Jesus Christ and even in Freemasonry. He describes his first bet with the Devil as a competition to see who could first attract twelve disciples. Dr. Parnassus shows his daughter a book containing symbolic images.

The Devil is here shown surrounded by clergymen. Parnassus says he uses the “necessities of danger, fear and the fabled bliss of ignorance” to attract disciples.
Parnassus teaches “the power of the imagination to transform and illuminate our lives”. He is here depicted as Jesus Christ with his third eye open, floating under the Eye of the Great Architect. Notice on the left a symbol that is very similar to a Masonic square and compass.

Parnassus won that first bet, but he was tricked: the Devil let him win. The Devil knew that, in due time, “nobody would want to hear Parnassus’ stories”. In other words, the Devil knew the world would spiral back into ignorance, ultimately finding itself in the spiritual state we are in today. Parnassus’ show (a metaphor for the path to Illumination) is now a strange novelty, a road-side curiosity that is ignored by most everyday people who are too busy to ponder on its teachings. Then comes Tony.

Tony Liar

Found by Parnassus’ traveling troupe hanging under a bridge, Tony Liar (whose name is based on British Prime Minister Tony Blair) may or may not have been sent by the Devil. Despite his mysterious past, Tony is integrated into to the show and he quickly uses his charming yet dishonest ways to attract more people to the show. He is, however, focused on generating more money and is not interested in people’s spiritual salvation. He finally convinces Parnassus to change the style of the show to make it more modern and to change the audience to make it more … rich.

To illustrate his point about being modern, Tony shows Parnassus a photo in a magazine of a girl making the “a-ok” sign in front of her eyes … interesting.

Tony tells Parnassus not to hide his “mind control thing”, to be bold and to reach the right kind of public. This is the result:

A tri-dimensional Masonic checkerboard pattern leads the way to the “magic mirror”, the gateway to the spiritual plane. Did Freemasonry “repackage” the ancient Mysteries in a way that would be attractive to the upper-class?

The new stage is set in an elegant shopping mall. There is also a change of philosophy: instead of asking for donations, there is box filled with money stating “Please Take Generously”. The bold marketing ploy pays off and those who experience the “other side of the mirror” come back totally fulfilled, leaving behind their money, fur coats and jewelry.

Tony himself finally experiences the joys of the spiritual plane and finds himself climbing the ladder to Illumination.

Tony is here played by Jude Law, one of the three actors who replaced Heath Ledger after his premature death.

His climb is stopped however by his troublesome past (the Russian mafia) catching up to him, and the ladder breaks. Spiritual enlightenment cannot be obtained by just anyone. He has however tasted the feeling of “being like a god”.

Heath Ledger’s Sacrifice

While The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus communicates an inspiring spiritual message, there is a rather grim side to the movie that relates to Heath Ledger’s death. The concept of duality is present within the movie itself where the tales of illumination are mixed with references to black magic and sacrificial death. Good and evil struggle again. The numerous references to death during the movie could be interpreted as a tribute to Heath Ledger, but, as Terry Gilliam states, none of the script was rewritten after the tragedy. Here is an excerpt of the director’s interview with Last Broadcast:

The film is terribly poignant film to watch now because of the loss of Heath.

Yes, it is.

And there are the references to death in the film that seem terribly poignant in the light of what happened. Did you re-emphasise any of that after his death?

The references to death were all in the original script, which people don’t understand. They all thought we had written this stuff after Heath had died and no, we didn’t change any of the words. And that to me is what’s so kind of scary and spooky – why was it so prescient? It seemed to be all about death, it’s so much of it.
Source

Not only there are many references to death, there are many references to sacrificial death. Knowing the odd circumstances in which Ledger lost his life, could his death be the result of a ritual sacrifice? Are there codes within the movie relating to it? This might sound improbable to the average person but, to the initiate of the occult practices of the entertainment industry, it is a definite possibility. The observations presented here might be coincidences or they might be signs placed on purpose. One thing is for sure: they are there. The first person that seemed freaked out by this was the director himself, who was apparently a friend of Ledger. In his interview with Sun Media, Gilliam stated:

“There are forces at work on this film, don’t get me into my mystical mode … but the film made itself and it was co-directed by Heath Ledger!”

Why is he implying that other forces were at work during the creation of this movie?

The Hanged Man

Right before the traveling troupe finds Tony hanging under a bridge, Dr Parnassus pulls out the Tarot card of the Hanged Man. It predicted what was about to happen but the occult significance of the card is even more relevant:

“Esoterically, the Hanged Man is the human spirit which is suspended from heaven by a single thread. Wisdom, not death, is the reward for this voluntary sacrifice during which the human soul, suspended above the world of illusion, and meditating upon its unreality, is rewarded by the achievement of self-realization.”
– Manly P. Hall, The Secret Teachings of All Ages

The Hanged Man indeed refers to the myth of the dying god who is committing the ultimate sacrifice in order to attain immortality.

“There is present in the rituals similarities of concepts or beliefs. In the ancient tradition it was believed that through the connection of the body and blood of the Slain God that the people became one with the deity. In the “Last Supper” Jesus declare that the bread and wine were his body and blood, which he gave up for the salvation of the people. Blood was believed to contain the life force. The death of the king freed the inner spirit. Through the distribution of his body and blood, heaven and earth were united and his vital energy renewed the kingdom.

The appearances of the Slain God have taken on various aspects throughout the ages. His images can be seen in the Jack-in-the-Green, the Hooded Man, the Hanged Man of the Tarot, the Lord of Vegetation, the Harvest, and the free untamed aspect of the forest.”
– Source

Anton and Valentina then find Tony hanging beneath Blackfriars Bridge.

Ledger’s previous movie was The Dark Knight in which he played The Joker – The Fool of the Tarot. Did The Fool evolve into the Hanging Man?

This scene is inspired by the actual 1982 hanging of Roberto Calvi (dubbed “God’s banker” due to his relations with the Vatican). The hanging took place under the exact same bridge. Although never publicly confirmed, there are strong theories that Roberto Calvi’s death was a symbolic and ritualistic murder carried out by the black masonic lodge called Propaganda Due, also referred to as P2. The name of the bridge is very significant:

“Mr. Calvi’s investigation indicates that his father was strangled, before his body was weighted and suspended underneath Blackfriars Bridge, probably by people who were in a small boat. The choice of bridge may have been significant: the P2 members referred to themselves as “frati neri” – black friars.”
-Source

Read More Here…

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Sherlock Holmes Film

Sherlock Holmes

The new Sherlock Holmes film featuring Robert Downey Jr. pits the Victorian detective against the villainous Lord Blackwood and involves an occult order known as the Temple of the Four Orders.

While the Temple of the Four Orders is an invention of the film, it clearly draws from sources such as the Freemasons and the Golden Dawn. Indeed, publicity concerning the film repeatedly compares Blackwood to onetime Golden Dawn member , although i personally find such a comparison to be rather stretching things.

Regardless, I have to applaud the film writers for doing a bit of homework! While occult scribbles abound throughout the film, there’s no references to Satan or demons. (A couple quick images of Baphomet are seen, but those are historically appropriate.) Imagery does include sphinxes, alchemical symbols, pentagrams and crosses, all of which make sense for a 19th century occult group. Their uses of layered symbolism in complex images likewise is congruent with what real world magical orders were creating at the time.

In short, the film largely abandons the usual exaggerated hysterics and instead builds a relatively believable occult group, while of course taking certain liberties for the good for the story.

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