Madonna Subverts the Boy Scouts

Madonna Boyscout Glaad

The Boy Scouts and the Order of the Arrow were both started by Freemasons, are based upon Freemasonry, and attempt to indoctrinate young men with masonic ideals.

The Boy Scouts of America is rare among major institutions in banning homosexuals, atheists and agnostics as leaders. In a decadent age, the BSA is unique in upholding God, country and traditional values.

Sir Robert Baden-Powell (1857-1941), returning from the Boer War which had lasted from 1999 to 1902, was suddenly a public figure. During this war he became famous in Britain for the defence of Mafeking. This town, under his command, had withstood a siege of 215 days, in spite of famine and sickness in his ranks. Baden-Powell maintained the defence successfully and earned the rank of Major-General. On his return to England he felt most strongly that the courage and skill of the scouts in the army should not be lost. These scouts had made such a significant contribution to the successful outcome of the war, that their skills should he passed on. Simultaneously he was convinced that the young people in Britain were not receiving enough physical exercise and experience in the outdoor life. He knew that by teaching scouting skills to young people -who would become the leaders of the future -he would be meeting two objectives.

In 1907 he started the Boy Scout movement in Great Britain by working with just twenty boys. To keep track of the many useful facts he was teaching the boys he wrote notes. These developed into a book that was first published in 1908 as the Boy Scout Handbook. In the years that followed, many millions of copies were sold and avidly absorbed by young boys throughout the world. From the sale of this book came the need for leaders and the huge organization which scouting is today. The scouting world is extensive by anyone’s standards because scouting is active in over 150 countries and is recognised by the World Bureau in 117 countries with more being recognised each year.

This movement, founded by the late Lord Baden-Powell of Gilwell in 1908, “to help boys of whatever class to become all-round men,” has been developed with great spirit and success in many countries of the world. Its aim is to develop good citizenship among boys by forming their character — training them in habits of observation, obedience, and self reliance — inculcating loyalty and thoughtfulness for others — teaching them services useful to the public and handicrafts useful to themselves —promoting their physical development and hygiene.

L. Mary Barker, ed., Pears Cyclopaedia. (Isleworth, Middlesex: A. & F Pears, Ltd., Autumn, 1950), p. 643.

Masonic Symbols

Psalm 8:2 NIV From the lips of children and infants you have ordained praise …

The Masonic Bible has a square and compass on it. …. In the Masonic Lodge, they have a KJV Bible opened up to Psalm 133 Behold how good it is for brethren …

The Messianic Psalms

Jesus said everything written about Him in the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms must be fulfilled. Most of the Psalms were written by David, and Acts 2:30 says David was a prophet! That means the Psalms are more than just a collection of poems – they are prophetic messages, and they are full of rich revelation to those who have eyes to see.

I have been intrigued by hidden prophecies in the Psalms. It is evident that they give the story of the return of the Jews to their Promised Land, beginning with 1901 and continuing psalm by psalm to this very day.

Madonna wears the number 13!

Death Tarot

The early creators of the Tarot seem to have followed the more negative connotations of the number. They certainly ensured that number 13 was always associated with the Death card, although numbers fluctuated for the other cards. However, today the interpretation is more of transformation and change than bad luck. Every time we alter something in our lives, we encounter a little death; when we move, change jobs, even (according to Lisa Alther in Kinflicks) have sex. So the Death card is about mortality and a voluntary surrender of the old (in comparison with The Tower, which destroys the old in a flash, whether we will or no). It’s also about stripping away the ego, necessary if we are to move on spiritually. If the card is reversed, it probably indicates an inability to change, stagnation.

Number thirteen also relates to the Queens of each suit (not the Kings, as previously and erroneously inserted in the previous version of ’13′! Apparently no-one noticed this as I would have expected at least one comment, if you had).

As we’ve seen already, 13 is a number particularly associated with the feminine, so it is apt that we find the Queens occupying the 13th slot of the numbered cards.

13 is also America’s number because of her original 13 colonies.

The Illuminati (13 Ruling Crime Families) is a ritualistic organization that has been around since the Christian crusades. It has a special way of looking at numbers that we should all know about and uses the numbers for ritualistic witchcraft.

13 represents the death of the American Republic and the birth of the North American Union on 9/11 2001!

September Morn

The UN is ready to send peacekeeping troops into the US for the imminent false flag terror attack. One day while sitting in class you’ll look outside the window to see Russians dropping down to take us over. What are you gonna do then, huh? Run into the woods with your friends, put twigs in your hair, call yourselves the Wolverines and fight off the Russians? I think not.

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Jews, Masons, and Modernists are Enemies of the Church

Bishop Bernard Fellay

New Hamburg, Canada, Jan 4, 2013 / 04:37 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Bishop Bernard Fellay, the head of the traditionalist Society of St. Pius X, mentioned Jews as “enemies of the Church” in a recent address reviewing the situation of the group as it considered full communion with Rome this past year.

“Who, during that time, was the most opposed that the Church would recognize the Society? The enemies of the Church. The Jews, the Masons, the Modernists,” Bishop Fellay, superior general of the society, said during a talk Dec. 28 at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Chapel in New Hamburg, Ontario.

The comment was made in passing during the wide-ranging address, which lasted one hour and 40 minutes.

The Society of St. Pius X was founded by Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre in 1970 as a response to what he described as errors that had crept into the Church following the Second Vatican Council. Its relations with the Vatican became strained in 1988 when Archbishop Lefebvre consecrated four bishops without the permission of Pope John Paul II.

Since Benedict XVI became the Pope, talks to reconcile the society with the Church have intensified, with a particular increase in 2012. However, the discussions seem to have broken down over the summer.

Speaking about this impasse, Bishop Fellay said that groups “outside the Church, who were clearly during centuries, were enemies of the Church,” expressed opposition to the reconciliation of the traditionalist society with the Catholic Church. His reference to “groups” seems to have been a reference his earlier mention of “the Jews, the Masons, the Modernists.”

The bishop said that 2012 saw trials “extended to almost the whole Society,” an experience he worried could mean “some people have then lost the trust in the authority.”
Bishop Fellay said that the society has received mixed signals from Rome, and that talks eventually broke down with accusations of the Pius X Society being “Protestants,” and of Roman Catholics being “Modernists.”

The group’s position, according to Bishop Fellay, is that the portions of the Second Vatican Council “opposed to what the Church has always taught” must be rejected. He said that Pope Benedict’s “hermeneutic of continuity” is untenable because the council documents are in places “contrary” or “opposed to Tradition.”

But Bishop Fellay said that he remains hopeful for the situation in the long-term, even if reconciliation will not be possible in the near future.
“The situation is not desperate, no. It’s not worse than before … there’s some hope. I don’t think for right for now, but for us, we just continue.”

We must “continue to pray to the Blessed Virgin Mary, pray the Rosary,” Bishop Fellay concluded.

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What is Pitbull Into?

Pitbull Cuba

What is Pitbull into that’s deeper than the masons? Santeria?

“Give Me Everything”
(feat. Ne-Yo, Afrojack, Nayer)

[Ne-Yo]
Grab somebody sexy, tell ’em hey
Give me everything tonight
Give me everything tonight
Give me everything tonight
Give me everything tonight

[Verse 2: Pitbull]
Reach for the stars
And if you don’t grab ’em,
At least you’ll fall on top of the world
Think about it
Cuz if you slip,
I’m gon’ fall on top yo girl (hahaa)
What I’m involved with
Is deeper than the masons
Baby, baby, and it ain’t no secret

My family’s from Cuba
But I’m an American Idol
Get money like Seacrest

Santeria
Was founded in 1517:

History:

Santeria orginated in Cuba as a combination of the Western African Yoruba Religion and Iberian Catholicism . “It is one of the many syncretic religions created by Africans brought to the Caribbean islands as slaves. It was developed out of necessity for the African slaves in order to continue practicing their native religion in the New World. As in all countries where the African slaves were taken, Cuban slave masters discouraged and sometimes prohibited the practice of their native religions .

The slaves in Cuba were forced to follow the practices of the Catholic Church, which went against the beliefs of their native religions. Noticing the parallels between their native religion and Catholicism, and in order to please their slave-masters and fulfill their own religious needs, they created a secret religion. Santeria uses Catholic saints and personages as fronts for their own god and Orishas (spiritual emissaries). Thus, when a slave prayed to an Orisha, it looked as if they were praying to a saint.

After some slaves had been freed in Cuba, “the genre de color (free people of color) created Santeria on the basis of old Yoruba beliefs and practices. African religious traditions were reinvented and fused with elements of the Spanish culture, an example of assimilation — the fusion, both culturally and socially, of groups with distinctive identities. In the 1880’s the syncretism was further embellished by the addition of Kardecian Spiritist traditions brought from France.” These had an influence on Santeria by incorporating the aspect of spirit enlightenment in its practices. This process of seeking light has been incorporated in worshiping the Orisha 41 . Santeria spread quickly in the New World among the slaves who originated from Western Africa. When slave trade was abolished, the practice of Santeria carried on.

The religion was practiced in secret, because people frowned on the bizarre traditions of the African natives. Although today the necessity for keeping the religion secret has mostly vanished, it is practiced today out of a strong sense of tradition. Santeria now lives on in small numbers in many countries around the world: the U.S. (New York, Florida), South American countries, and Europe. It is still mostly practiced in secret, but a few churches have emerged, giving the people a place to practice Santeria freely. One in particular, The Church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye , was formed in the early 1970’s in Southern Florida. It unites many Cuban Americans in this region, and allows them to practice Santeria freely and publicly. But this did not occur without a struggle. As we shall see below , the church’s practice of animal sacrifice was outlawed by the city of Hialeah only to be restored in a landmark decision by the U.S. Supreme Court.

There are several other churches in the United States that practice Santeria. The African Theological Archministry, in South Carolina, founded by Walter Eugene King, now has approximately 10,000 members 4 . The Church of Seven African Powers, also in Florida, was founded in the 1980’s, and focuses on the ebo (spells) and instructs members how to use them in their lives .

Sacred or Revered Texts: Santeria has no written canon or formal texts of their religion. It is passed on orally to the initiates. This is because of the thick tradition of stories being told to convey the beliefs and ways of worship of the religion.

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Where Mel Gibson Got His Anti-Semitism

Mel ADL

By Heidi Beirich, Intelligence Report
Posted on January 27, 2007

“fracking Jews!”

So began Mel Gibson’s now infamous anti-Semitic rant to Los Angeles sheriff’s deputies who pulled him over on suspicion of drunken driving last July. “The Jews are responsible for all the wars in the world,” the world-famous movie actor continued, before asking his arresting officer: “Are you a Jew?”

After his tirade made international news, Gibson promptly disappeared into an addiction clinic. He left behind a statement, released through a spokesman, begging the Jewish community for forgiveness and suggesting that booze was to blame. He was, he wrote, “in the process of understanding where those vicious words came from during that drunken display.” But their origin is easy enough to pinpoint — the extremist Catholic beliefs Gibson learned at the knees of his anti-Semitic father.

Gibson’s dad, Hutton Gibson, is an important player in the shadowy world of radical traditionalist Catholicism, also known as “integrism” or Catholic separatism. This religious subculture’s teachings have little in common with the modern Roman Catholic Church and its universalistic theology. Hutton Gibson, for one, is a well-known Holocaust denier who believes the Second Vatican Council reforms of the 1960s, which made the church vastly more tolerant of other faiths, were the result of “a Masonic plot backed by the Jews.” He is particularly incensed by the council’s historic declaration, “Nostra Aetate,” which condemned “all hatreds, persecutions, displays of anti-Semitism leveled at any time or from any source against the Jews.” In Gibson’s world, the Second Vatican Council’s liberalizing reforms are rejected and anti-Semitic teachings and conspiracy theories are heartily embraced.

Like father, like son.

Mel Gibson has his own traditionalist house of worship near Los Angeles — a church, funded entirely by him, that is not recognized by the Los Angeles Roman Catholic Archdiocese. It is unclear what is said in the hallowed halls of the Holy Family Chapel, since, unlike virtually all other Catholic churches, it is closed to the public. What is known is that Gibson is reported to have blamed Jews for forcing him to cut a scene, in which Jews and their descendants are held responsible for the murder of Christ, from his 2004 film, “The Passion of the Christ.” Sounding a bit like he did that July night in Malibu, Gibson told The New Yorker: “If I included that in there, they’d be coming after me at my house. They’d come to kill me.”

Few Americans defended Mel Gibson’s drunken rant about the evils of the Jews. But radical traditionalist Catholics did. A three-year investigation of this subculture by the Intelligence Report has found that these Catholic extremists, including the Gibsons, may well represent the largest population of anti-Semites in the United States. Organized into a network of more than a dozen organizations, scores of websites and several extremist churches and monasteries, radical traditionalists in the U.S. are preaching anti-Semitism to as many as 100,000 followers. A few, such as the lawyer for Terri Schiavo’s family, Christopher Ferrara, are even movers and shakers in important right-wing Republican circles.

Jew-bashing at the Holiday Inn

The Philadelphia airport Holiday Inn is an odd place to celebrate a Catholic mass, especially in a city filled with lovely churches and an extraordinary, century-old Romanesque cathedral. But the inn is where the radical traditionalist Catholic outfit, (CFN), held its annual conference in 2003, dressing up one end of a drab conference room with an altar, incense, and a statue of the Virgin Mary, and transforming it into a church.

The rest of the hall looked rather different. Vendors set up folding tables along almost every inch of the remaining walls, piling them high with books, videotapes and Catholic accessories. The stacks were notable for the prominence of anti-Semitic and extremist materials, from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion to Hutton Gibson’s Is the Pope Catholic? to CFN head John Vennari’s popular anti-Semitic conspiracy tract, The Permanent Instruction of the Alta Vendita. Priests in Roman collars staffed many tables; brown-cloaked monks manned others.

CFN conferences hearken back to the era before the Roman Catholic Church enacted the liberalizing Vatican II reforms, which removed from the weekly Mass prayers for the conversion of the Jews and also ended the centuries-old practice of celebrating the Mass in Latin, the Vatican’s official language. At the Holiday Inn in 2003, Sunday’s religious activities started with a now rarely celebrated hour-long recitation of the rosary. After that, apostate priests conducted a rendition of the Latin Mass, a format dating to the Middle Ages, before an audience remarkable for the veils that covered every woman’s hair and the time it spent on its knees.

Vatican II did not ban these time-honored celebrations, and many Catholics who call themselves “traditionalists” continue to worship in this manner in churches that remain an official part of the Holy See (these churches are awarded an “indult” that allows them to continue celebrating the Latin Mass). The vast majority of those who practice Catholicism in this older form are unrelated to the radical traditionalist Catholics who gathered in Philadelphia. Indeed, the groups that gave presentations at the CFN conference preach a theology specifically rejected by the Vatican, and many have been declared schismatic, or officially separated from the church.

The participants at the CFN conference spent most of their time bashing Jews and, in particular, dwelling on the perils of much-feared “Judeo-Masonic” plot. As preached from the pulpit that day, the alleged conspiracy involves ancient, shadowy fraternities such as the Masons and the Illuminati, who are seen as puppets in a Jewish master plan aimed at destroying the Catholic Church. The theory is laid out in great detail in Venarri’s Alta Vendita, which has been compared to The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, an infamous tract also alleging a global plot by the Jews.

But the “Judeo-Masonic” plot wasn’t the only fearful conspiracy that was described that day. There was also the “Marxist-Jewish” scheme that is ruining our schools, the “Jewish-homosexual” alliance that is destroying the priesthood, and, naturally, the 9/11 conspiracy, which has to do with the fact that the 2001 terrorist attacks were actually “predicted by the Blessed Virgin Mary 84 years ago.”

The passion of the anti-Semites

The Philadelphia Jew-bashing was not a one-off. Several such conferences are held quietly around the country each year, and they attract thousands upon thousands of people. The Intelligence Report also attended a radical traditionalist conference held in 2005, a year and a half after CFN’s. Put on by the St. Joseph Forum (SJF) of South Bend, Ind., the conference was held at a Quality Inn up the road from Notre Dame, the esteemed Catholic university seen by conference attendees as fatally corrupted by multiculturalism and religious tolerance.

The SJF conference, attended by more than 250 people, was awash with extremists. A favorite of the crowd was Father Stephen Somerville, who Mel Gibson employed as his spiritual adviser during the filming of “The Passion of the Christ.” Somerville was suspended in 2004 by the Vatican for schismatic behavior and is a popular speaker at radical traditionalist Catholic conferences. At the forum, he raged at “a corrupt subculture or network of homosexuals” ruining the priesthood.

But the most extreme comments of the weekend came from Brother Anthony Mary of the Slaves of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, a monastery and order based in Richmond, N.H. (The Slaves were founded in the 1950s by Boston-based priest Leonard Feeney, an anti-Semite ultimately excommunicated by the Vatican.) Mary’s presentation was entitled, “The Fruits of Zionism.”

“The perpetual enemy of Christ is the Jewish nation,” Brother Mary roared, explaining that the aim of the Jews is to “destroy all Christian nations.” Mary blamed Jews for both world wars — an opinion also mouthed by the drunken Mel Gibson — and a coming world government. Professing from the pulpit a “great hatred” of Jews, Brother Mary declared that “Jews are the synagogue of Satan” — a phrase that is also part of the official ideology of the neo-Nazi Aryan Nations. “We must always and everywhere,” he added, “oppose Jewish schemes.”

An unsavory tradition

Since the colonial period, American society has been marred by sometimes savage anti-Catholic prejudice, an antipathy that mushroomed as waves of Irish, Italian and German Catholics arrived here in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Anti-Catholic hatred fueled the 1850s rise of the Know Nothings, the largest third party in U.S. history, and it also drove the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s, when nearly 4 million Americans became members.

Yet some of America’s greatest peddlers of hate have themselves been extremist Catholics. The best known of these was Father Charles Coughlin, the Michigan “radio priest” who at his height in the late 1930s was spewing pro-Nazi propaganda to 3.5 million listeners on his CBS radio broadcasts. Repeating common anti-Semitic canards, Coughlin blamed the Great Depression on an “international conspiracy of Jewish bankers”; Jews also got the blame for communism. Two weeks after the German national pogrom known as Kristallnacht, Coughlin blamed the Jews for their own persecution, making him a hero in the German press. Also in 1938, Coughlin published an article in his Social Justice weekly — which at one point had 1 million subscribers — attacking Jews, atheists and communists. Parts of the article were plagiarized directly from the English translation of a 1935 speech by Hitler’s propaganda minister, Joseph Goebbels. Coughlin was finally forced off the air in October 1939, the month after Nazi Germany’s invasion of Poland.

Two other priests, both now dead, serve as the primary inspiration for today’s radical traditionalist Catholics. The first is Father Denis Fahey, an Irish priest who died in 1954 and was much admired by Coughlin — just as he is also admired by today’s neo-Nazis, some of whom have contributed a number of his quotes to “1,001 Quotes By and About Jews,” a feature on the racist Stormfront website.

Fahey was a prolific author whose main topic was the inherent evil of the “Jewish Nation.” Repeating classic anti-Semitic allegations, Fahey blamed nearly all iniquity on Jews. According to an article by Sandra Miesel in Crisis, a conservative Catholic magazine, Fahey “enjoyed quoting papal policy statements against Jews, coyly refused to reject the long-debunked Protocols [of the Elders of Zion], praised the anti-Semitic activities of [automaker] Henry Ford, and denied the death toll from the Holocaust.” Taking on the church’s main bogeyman in the early 1900s, Fahey laid atheistic communism directly at the feet of the Jews: “The real forces behind Bolshevism are Jewish forces, and Bolshevism is really an instrument in the hands of the Jews for their establishment of their future Messianic kingdom.”

While spouting the same kind of anti-Jewish propaganda as the Nazis, Fahey crafted an argument that he believed should exempt him from the label of anti-Semite. Fahey claimed he didn’t hate the Jews per se, but merely opposed their “naturalistic aims.” Since he also argued that Jews can’t help but work to further those aims — communism, the destruction of Christianity, and the like — this was a distinction without a difference. (Today’s radical traditionalist Catholics, including the Society of St. Pius X, a far-right powerhouse that has thousands of supporters, continue to claim they are not anti-Semitic, just against “Jewish naturalism.”)

Along with Coughlin, Fahey is the main source for The Plot Against the Church, a 1967 book supposedly written by 12 clerics under the pen name “Maurice Pinay.” Similar to the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, the book blames Jews, also referred to as the “synagogue of Satan,” for every evil that has befallen Catholics from Roman times to the present. Citing ancient papal writings, the book suggests that Jews be expelled or enslaved, segregated and forced to wear visible marks. It’s little wonder that modern neo-Nazis praise Pinay’s work. But so do large numbers of radical traditionalist Catholics, and the book is sold by Omni Christian Book Club, the favorite bookseller of today’s radical traditionalists.

The beat goes on

The second great inspiration for contemporary radical traditionalists is Father Leonard Feeney, another fervent anti-Semite who was for years a leader of Boston’s St. Benedict Center, a Jesuit institution. Feeney is best known in Catholic circles for his especially hard-line version of the “no salvation outside the church” doctrine.

Feeney also is known for preaching against Jews on the Boston Common with his followers. Although he was finally excommunicated for disobedience in 1953, he rapidly founded his own order, Slaves of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, and started a newsletter, The Point, that was suffused with anti-Semitism. Feeney’s newsletter blamed Jews for controlling and biasing the press and for creating communism. One article lambasted Jews for their role in the “anti-hate” initiatives that it despised. Another, published in April 1958, was entitled “Newspapers and The New York Times: Other Jews and Minister Sulzberger” and summed up the Jewish “problem” like this: “Essential to the understanding of our chaotic times is the knowledge that the Jewish race constitutes a united anti-Christian bloc within Christian society, and is working for the overthrow of that society by every means at its disposal.”

Feeney did reconcile with the church in 1974, four years before his death. But his anti-Semitic ideas remain popular in radical traditionalist Catholic circles and in the New Hampshire monastery his followers started, which still endorses his anti-Semitic ideology, to the point that a New Hampshire bishop lambasted the monastery’s teachings in 2004 as “blatantly anti-Semitic” and “offensive.”

The bishop isn’t the only one who sees Feeney as anti-Semitic. One white supremacist has created an online archive of Feeney’s writings (fatherfeeney.org) for the benefit of fellow Aryans. It is part of the so-called “World White Web.”

A dynamic movement

Today’s radical traditionalist Catholics — the theological descendants of Feeney and Fahey — are part of a thriving, energetic movement, even if it is one that is tiny when compared to the approximately 70 million Americans who are mainstream Catholics. The dozen or so organizations that make up this movement read each other’s writings, buy each other’s conference tapes, and co-publish major theological works. They put on conferences several times each year that are served by circuit-riding preachers like Brother Mary and Father Nicholas Gruner.

The movement is important for a number of reasons. It is growing, and spreading its anti-Semitic teachings, at a time when anti-Semitism and religious conflict generally are clearly resurgent around the world. Some of the most radical of the traditionalists are increasingly interacting with neo-Nazis and their fellow travelers. For example, John Sharpe, head of the anti-Semitic Legion of St. Louis, attended the 2006 conference of American Renaissance, a racist publication that specializes in race and intelligence. That same year, Father Gruner, leader of the International Fatima Rosary Crusade, attended a conference of The Barnes Review, a Holocaust denial journal. Gruner celebrated a special Mass at the Washington, D.C., conference, which was also attended by an array of long-time neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other anti-Semites.

The radical traditionalists may also be gaining influence on the larger political scene. The best example of this is Christopher Ferrara, the lawyer who in 1990 started the American Catholic Lawyers Association to defend “Catholics in religious and civil liberties cases.” Ferrara writes for anti-Semitic traditionalist journals like The Remnant. He recently said Pope Benedict XVI had “abased himself by entering a synagogue.” He uses Robert Sungenis, a particularly venomous anti-Semite, to staff the “Apologetics Desk” at his legal organization. But he also was the lawyer for the family of Terri Schiavo, the brain-damaged Florida woman whose feeding tube was removed in 2005 after a protracted court battle. In that role, Ferrara rubbed shoulders with key Republican and Christian Right leaders who convinced Congress to pass a law to protect Schiavo that was ultimately killed by the courts.

If radical traditionalists belong to a particular sect — and many do not — it is most typically the Society of St. Pius X (SSPX), a sprawling international group that publishes reams of anti-Semitic writings on its website and is based, in the United States, in Kansas City, Kan. In the late 1980s, Pope John Paul II excommunicated all SSPX priests and declared the sect formally in schism, but it has continued to grow. In America, 20,000 to 30,000 people are members.

Many of these radical traditionalists embrace “sedevacantism,” a word derived from the Latin that refers to a period when “the see [or seat] is vacant.” While the term is the official Roman Catholic word for the period between a pope’s death and the election of his successor, many radicals are sedevacantists in the sense that they believe that there has not been a real pope for years (typically, since 1958 ). Some have adopted conspiracy theories about rigged papal elections and even the idea that the authentic pope is secretly being held in captivity.

The radicals’ understanding of what has gone wrong with the world boils down to a few basic things. They believe that most of the theological developments within the church since Vatican II have been egregiously wrong, especially with regard to reconciling with Jews and the followers of other faiths. They despise the Vatican’s ecumenical outreach efforts. And they lament the fall of the Latin Mass and argue that the new Mass, “Novus Ordo,” does not guarantee salvation. Through it all, disdain and even outright hatred for Jews flows like a poisonous river.

A Joyless faith

For the vast majority of Catholics, the existence of an anti-Semitic, sedevacantist subculture is highly distressing. The church has worked extraordinarily hard in recent decades to distance itself from anti-Semitic teachings and the idea of forcing its view of the world on unbelievers. And, by most accounts, it has been successful, with many Jewish and organizations from other faiths praising its efforts. Abe Foxman, head of the Anti-Defamation League, signaled his gratitude after the 2005 death of Pope John Paul II, who, he said, “revolutionized Catholic-Jewish relations” by denouncing anti-Semitism as a “sin against God and humanity.” More recently, Pope Benedict XVI’s repeated clarifications of statements he made about the Islamic faith in September reflected a commitment to interfaith dialogue.

Yet the ranks of the radical traditionalists seem to be swelling. Michael Cuneo, a scholar of Catholicism, wrote in his 1997 book The Smoke of Satan that weekly attendance at American chapels of the Society of St. Pius X had been growing at about 10% annually since the late 1980s. Today, SSPX, which raises its own funds without help from Rome, employs 336 member priests in 27 different countries, teaches 226 seminarians in six international seminaries, runs 130 priories, and serves more than 600 Mass centers. The group also runs nine retreat houses, 14 major schools, and another 50 schools connected to priories or chapels.

Stephen Hand, a respected Catholic theologian and editor of the Web-based Traditional Catholic Reflections and Reports, wrote in 2000 of his worries about the growth of the movement. “Integrism,” he said in his book Tradition, Traditionalists and Private Judgment in a reference to radical traditionalist Catholicism, “is a bitter affair, a joyless ‘faith.’ It thrives on polemics, on opposition and hatred.”

There is little question that much of the world is seeing a resurgence of ethnic and religious hatreds and accompanying violence. As dangerous conflicts between Christianity and radical versions of Islam multiply around the globe, the last thing humanity needs is still one more form of religiously based extremism.

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Hutton Gibson on 9/11

Hutton Gibson

As a young man, Hutton Gibson studied for the priesthood, but balked when offered a choice between a parish in New Guinea or another in the Philippines. He briefly delivered telegraphs for Western Union, then worked for decades as a railroad brakeman, until a work injury forced his early retirement. He won $4,680 on the Art Fleming version of Jeopardy in 1968, and spent his winnings relocating his family to Australia, to help his sons avoid the Vietnam war draft.

When he became worried about the heathen ways of the Catholic church, Gibson joined the a splinter group called the Latin Mass Society. He rose to the position of secretary before being booted for being too outspoken in his criticisms of Pope John Paul II. His children all full-grown, the elder Gibson has returned to America, where he has settled in a small town outside Houston. He is now a member of The Alliance for Catholic Traditions, a tiny schismatic sect of old believers who still hold worship services in Latin, and view the revisions of the Second Vatican Council in the early 1960s as a shadowy plot by Jews and Masons to take control of the Catholic church. And the plot worked, they believe, so the Pope isn’t really the Pope — he is an imposter, working covertly to destroy Catholicism.

Gibson is widely reported to be a Holocaust denier, but he bristles at the term. He says he doesn’t “deny” the Holocaust, he just thinks it was “exaggerated”. “They claimed that there were 6.2 million [Jews] in Poland before the war and after the war there were 200,000, therefore [Hitler] must have killed six-million of them.” But Gibson thinks he knows better. “They simply got up and left,” he says. “They were all over the Bronx and Brooklyn and Sydney and Los Angeles.” He believes that it wasn’t al Qaeda that comandeered four jets on September 11, but Jews — using remote control to pilot the planes. He also says evolution is bunk, and believes in the rhythm method of birth control (Gibson has eleven children). The family doesn’t celebrate Christmas with presents, because Gibson views it only as a religious holy day.

Like the character his son played in Conspiracy Theory, Gibson publishes a small-scale newsletter. It is called The War Is Now, and has “several hundred” subscribers, he says. He is also the author of such self-published “non-fiction” titles as Is the Pope Catholic? and The Enemy Is Here!.

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